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Challenge: Cabin Fever

I Never Wanted to Homeschool

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I never wanted to homeschool.

Seriously...never. It never, ever crossed my mind in a serious way. There were times I thought, "If we homeschool, we can go on vacation all the time! We can educate our daughter on the road!" And I know that works for some folks. But for me? Nope, nope, nope. I love my daughter, but we don't need to be together 24/7.

Yet here we are, in the middle of a pandemic, and homeschooling is the only way. I'm not officially homeschooling, because she is still signing in to her school website and having remote video "class" and conferences with teachers. Thank God. We just returned from "spring break," during which our trip was actually canceled, but we had a break nonetheless. And now school is starting back.

Lucky for us, our daughter is 16 and a sophomore in high school. She is old enough to figure it out herself. In fact, I have been receiving emails from her teachers about remote learning, and every time I see one, I think, "Really? Don't y'all tell us to be 'hands off' when they get to high school?" Why do they suddenly want us to be hands on?!? I know the students are home, but my daughter needs to drive this bus herself. I never know what her homework is, just like my mother never knew what my homework was in the 80s. That is entirely her responsibility.

When my daughter was in third grade, another mom approached me at school one day and asked, "Is your daughter ready for the Bunnicula test?" I must have looked at her like she had three heads, because I responded, "What the heck is a Bunnicula?" Apparently, it was a book they had read, and they were having a test on it that day. For a brief moment, I wondered how the other mom knew they were having a test! I had no idea, because even when she was in third grade, I didn't help with homework. I didn't help her get or stay organized. I didn't help her with her homework at all. It was all up to her. That was her job...just like it is now. I know...I know...some of you will say that was a little too hands off. Trust me, I am a very present parent in every other way, but I have always believed she needed to learn how to do her schoolwork the same way I did...without any help from parents. I remember when she was in sixth grade, I sat down with her and taught her my secret method for studying for tests, and she has thanked me a million times since. I'll offer guidance. But helping with daily homework? I've never done it.

She knows she can come to me for guidance when she needs it. I will always provide support and guidance. As recently as this morning, I reminded her that she needs to stay in close touch with her teachers. She needs to email or conference with them pretty regularly, even if she doesn't feel like she needs help. She needs to keep the lines of communication open. That's my advice for the day. That's how I help her with her education.

Many times I've told her about a calculus class I had in college. I had a low A going into the final, but I had been meeting with the teacher two or three times a week to keep that A. And then I bombed the final...I don't mean I made a C. I bombed it. Back then, to see our exam grades before we left school at the end of the semester, we had to go see where they were posted outside the teacher/professor's office door. After I saw my terrible grade, I entered his office, he said, "Oh, Kelly, you did not do well on the final." I said, "I saw that!" I then asked him what grade I would get for the semester (the final was supposed to have a lot of weight). Instead of answering me, he asked, "What grade do you think you deserve?" I would have said a C. But seeing an opening, I returned the question, "What do you think I deserve?" He looked at me, very kindly, and said, "I give you B. You do good in long journey." He was from another country and spoke in broken English...but in a beautiful way, and he was a very wise and compassionate man. I thanked him profusely, and I was on my way. I have remembered his kindness for all these years...and when someone in our family works hard and meets a goal or accomplishment, I say, "You do good in long journey."

That's my long way of saying I worked hard to try to get a good grade in that class, and my teacher recognized that. That's what I am encouraging my daughter to do right now. She has heard that story a million times, and as a teenager, she might not fully hear it, but one day, something will happen, and she will know I'm right.

So, while I'm sure her teachers and school are simply making sure I'm informed with those emails they're sending me, I'm not getting into the fray. If she were younger, I might have to jump in with both feet, but in 10th grade? Nah. She can do this, and she'll appreciate it a lot more if she does it on her own. She'll know she earned her grades.

Homeschooling? It's still not for me. I'll be team mom. I was a homeroom mom many times when she was in elementary school. I volunteer all over the place. But I'm not planning to take the reins on this pandemic "homeschooling."

She will "do good in long journey."

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